Donald Trump, carried by a demographic of edgy millennials from 4Chan, 8 Chan and Reddit, won the meme war during the 2016 Presidential Election.  These political memes undermined Hillary Clinton’s political narrative and exposed her inauthenticity, and reflected Trump’s capacity to connect and relate to his followers.

Memes aren’t new to the interwebs. Right from the turn of the century, sprung memeboards like demotivational posters, LOLZ cats and 9gag. Memes represent a viral medium of carrying a message, appealing to a generation of millennials. Throughout the years, various brands have tried (and some probably failed) to memes. C’mon, memes are serious (pun unintended) business, and its goes beyond slapping the impact font over some image, or putting kittens into your visuals.

Brands like McDonalds,  Gucci, Rochor Neighbourhood Police Centre have had their share of successful memes, garnering shares and virality for their memes, but what goes beyond reshares? Yes, that’s right – earned media. How do we lead a community to create memes to carry your message?

Meme Marketing

Okay – lets give them the credit for that.

Good try, Gucci!

Here came Duolingo.

Duolingo launched a Duolingo Push Campaign, meant as a April Fool’s spoof video to promote active daily learning on the Duolingo platform.

Duolingo meme marketing

The memers leaped on it, and it was history.

 

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

Duolingo Meme Marketing

The results?

Meme marketing

A positive upward trend for searches on Duolingo following the memes.

Are you ready to relook your communications strategy? (ie, are you ready to meme?)